Tag Archives: Religion & Philosophy

religion

Religion and The Power to Change

Today my Mother called me. I hesitated to answer the phone because – to be frank – her phone calls annoy me. She always seems a bit whiny and I can never listen to her go on for more than a few minutes. I usually pick up the phone and put up with it – for at least a few minutes – just because she’s my Mom.

A call about my Dad

The call goes something like this:

“Daddy really wants you to call him.” She has referred to him like that since I was a kid. “He’s off drugs and called me crying, he really wants you to call him.” I’m annoyed at this point – like going to church is someone’s free pass to sympathy and forgiveness.  I want actions – not a crutch used to help someone to feel less guilty!

“I know, I know. I’ll think about it.” I tell my mother I will consider calling my Father, but the truth is I won’t. I will not even entertain the idea. The phone works both ways and if God can miraculously get him off the methamphetamine then it can help him use the phone to call his son – this isn’t my job.

I get off the phone with my Mom as quickly as she called.

Change is happening everywhere, it seems

I tell my good friend Holden about what’s happened and he shares a similar story. He describes an experience that occurred just last weekend between he and his Father-in-Law (who he shares years of bad blood with).

Dude, I have a pretty fucking crazy story of a similar nature of my own.

So, I told you my father in law has been going to the church of tongues, being ordained as a minister… etc.

Well, last weekend I go to my wife’s grandmother’s house to get a shovel to do some yard work and her dad is back there with a truck, loading it up with old limbs and stuff.

He’s trying to lift a huge ass limb, so I get a hatchet and help him cut it up, load it up, etc. We just exchange small talk and pleasantries. We’re civil to each other.

Then I ask him if he needs help unloading all that shit at the landfill. He says no but says we need to talk.

He proceeds to apologize for every shit thing he’s ever done to me, thanks me for taking good care of his daughter, applauds my work ethic and getting the MBA even with a kid, preggo wife and full time job. Apologizes about everything, tells me he loves me, hes proud of me…

I return all the same gesture, we shake hands and that was that. He didn’t say anything to anyone, I didn’t say anything to the wife, nothing has been said about it since..

I was floored. WTF. Wow. If the attitude sticks, I will forever be proven wrong about the guy. Amazing.

Religion Allows Change

Can religion really change a man? If so, how?

I think there is no doubt that religion allows for change. Especially for the stubborn or prideful (aren’t we all…). However, I doubt the solution is a malevolent one. I mean I somehow doubt the grace of God or Jesus’ hand touches a man’s soul granting serenity. That’s all hocus-pocus to me – but I’m being cynical.

Rather than the mystic – I think the change religion grants a man is more natural, more obvious, and surly as equally effective. My theory is religion gives a prideful man an opening to change his bad habits without losing face to himself, his friends, and family. It give a guy an out, a second chance, a clean slate – and a chance to feel okay about it!

Maybe Christianity really is about forgiveness – like it says in the bible. Except in reality I don’t think it is God or Jesus who is doing the forgiving – rather it allows you to forgive yourself and allows your family to look beyond your mistakes and forgive you too. That is very positive and very powerful.

Maybe for those of us who aren’t religious we can learn an important lesson about the power to truly forgive our fellow man and ourselves. Almost all major religions teach these same lessons – To lose one’s ego and to forgive – I think they’re on to something.

Ants and Humans

Ants walk along the ground gathering dirt, piling it, making tunnels, storing food, and repeating. Then comes along some asshole kid who stomps on their perfectly crafted tunnels stirring their entire universe into a frenzy.

Of course the ants have no idea what just happened. A few chemicals go off in their nervous system alerting them to the fact an intruder has just crushed their pile of dirt. They automatically and instinctively begin rebuilding and trying to kill whatever non-ant being has entered their territory.

Some ants never cross paths with a human. Most live their entire lives crawling through the forest acting based on their instincts, happily. It never occurs to them they aren’t thinking. They have no ability to develop thoughts or complex ideas. They just crawl on the ground.

What if we are ants of the Universe?

What if we are ants to some other organism in the Universe. What if there is some being so complex and advanced that we don’t even have the mental capacity to even think to perceive what they might be. Almost like trying to imagine a new color – we simply can’t because our brain will not allow us to perform such a function.

Maybe it’s like a hypothetical shadow creature attempting to perceive the world in 3D. It simply can’t because the everything it understands to exist is on a flat plain.

What if the other phenomena’s existence – exist in such a way we can’t understand or even conceptualize it.   Like an ant solving complex physics equations – we do not have the ability to perceive the masters of our Universe.

To think we are the most complex forms of life in the Universe seems ignorant and impossible. I wonder if other people think about that?

Just a thought before bed.

 

religion

How to have a relationship with an Atheist

My wife is Catholic. She was born and raised in church. She finds comfort in the community, the family bond, and the idea that God is actively involved in her life – keeping her safe. She enjoys the traditions, loves Christmas time, uses prayer as a form of meditation when life is tough. She’s also married to a non-believer. Me.

My wife is aware of my agnosticism and honestly she doesn’t like it. She can’t relate to my way of thinking. She says I’m all logic and reason with no emotion. Of course that is partially true, but on the same token I fail to understand why she is pure emotion. In a way we balance each other out nicely. I remind her to think it through while she reminds me to have a heart. I don’t think this dynamic is unusual in a relationship.

Discussions on Religion

Sometimes we have brief discussions about religion, but I’m a bully. My thoughts are logical and well thought out – I have data points and examples to prove my thesis. My wife relies heavily on the emotional aspect, faith, and why religion just “feels” right. We quickly realize we aren’t speaking one another’s language and aren’t likely to convince the other of anything.

I don’t want my wife to be Atheist though. There’s something about her conviction that I really love. If religion is where she finds her source of strength and balance who am I to take that away. She’s peaceful and doesn’t use religion as a weapon – overall it’s a positive thing in her life. I suppose it’s no different than the way I use my own thoughts and moments of meditation to get through life.

Finding Happiness with Difference

Sometime people wonder how a believer and a non-believer can live a happy life together. The two ways of thinking seem almost diametrically opposed to one another. They’re not.

We still share the same morals. In principal I believe that many of the moral lesson taught by Jesus were good ones – just as I believe the lesson taught by the Buddha or Gandhi are good. So often instead of focusing on our difference – I focus on what works for us.

Good and Bad on Both Sides

While I am basically against the brainwash of organized religion I do not deny that there are good and bad people on both sides of the religious spectrum.   The Priest that married my wife and I is one of the most wonderful people I have ever met. He is thoughtful, educated, and everything a man of the cloth should be. Carl Sagan, an Atheist, was by all accounts also a great man. I’ll bet if the two of them met they would have a lovely conversation.

I think my overall point, from a non-religious perspective, is that life is more about who you are as a person than what your particular beliefs are. Be a good person – religious or not religious. That is how my wife and I treat our relationship (though we’ve never officially said that). My wife is a wonderful, caring, beautiful person – much better than me. I try to be a man of integrity who puts his family first – treat people with respect. We both WANT to be good people, that’s an important step.

What about the Kids?

How will I raise my kids? I’ll raise my kids with truth and without bias. I’ll teach my children what the historians say, I’ll teach them to about the world’s religions, and a variety of viewpoints. My wife will undoubtedly teach them about Christianity, the tradition, the love, and the comfort of religion. Both are important.

I have complete trust in my future children’s ability to choose what life suits them best – without my wife or I forcing them into anything. What is important to me isn’t if my children are Christian’s or Atheists, but rather if they are good people.

Giving my children the ability to think for themselves is the greatest gift a father can give. Along with that comes the trust that my future children can make decisions for themselves. Love, support, trust, and freedom – that is what my children will receive. I don’t think anyone can ask much more than that from their parents.

Where they fall on the religious spectrum will be up to them.

Thoughts?

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Jesus the Sun God?

There are undeniable correlations from religion to religion. For example, almost all religions have a flood story. In the story the creator flooded the earth because of our bad behavior, but a few chosen were spared and left to repopulate the earth. This theme can be found across the Globe from the Mayans, the Greeks, and of course in Christianity.

Some might argue these correlations are evidence of the truth of the story. Obviously the flood happened because sparse populations all across the globe are talking about it. Right?

Maybe there is some truth to that, but I think a more likely scenario is that over time these legends and stories have been borrowed and integrated. It’s important to remember that much of religion and culture is based on oral tradition – and if you’ve ever played the telephone game (where you pass a sentence around a group of people until it gets back to the original person and laugh at how much it has changed) you know that ideas and “truth” can change drastically in a short period of time.

Historicity of Jesus

One thing a lot of people fail to realize is that the history and story of Jesus was not written down until almost 100 years after his life and death. Most of these stories (some compiled in the bible) come from corespondents and letters written by Christians. (i.e., Letters of Paul).

Some people have the mis-understanding that the Paul, John, Matthew, etc. from the books of the bible are eye witnesses – Jesus’s disciples. This is just not accurate. No Priest or Pastor would disagree with me there. So ask yourself: how much of the story was changed, exaggerated, mis-remembered, and manipulated after 100 years of oral tradition?

Edit: The information to follow is highly disputed and for the most part subject to interpretation. After you watch the video give this website a once over and decide how serious to take it.

In general, describing Jesus goes something like this:

1. Born of a Virgin
2. Performed Miracles
3. Known as the light, the truth, God’s Son, etc.
4. 12 disciples
5. December 25th: Star of Bethlehem, followed by three kings on his birth night
6. Sacrificed himself for the sins of the people
7. Resurrected after 3 days

It turns out this story, like the flood story, is pretty common. See the video below.

eBook: I need your help

As I write this blog post I am approximately half way through my first ebook entitled:

Liberty and Reason
Five controversial issues that affect your Freedom

Essentially the idea is to tackle five controversial issues (i.e., Gun Control, War on Drugs, Abortion, etc.) and walk through each one on a logical basis in an attempt to develop a stance. I offer my own opinion as well as statistics and data to support each point, much like this blog, except I have taken a little more time for research and readability.

So far, at least one of my previously held opinions has been changed – which is hopefully a good sign as related to my research.

What do I need from you?

This is where you come in, my faithful and loyal readers. I want to know:

1. What would make you want to read this ebook?
2. Would you buy a book if it was offered in hard copy (for say, $2 – $5)?
3. Publishing: Anyone have any experience or advice? Know any publishers?
4. Any general comments, questions, and suggestions welcome.

I am pretty excited about the whole process and your feedback is very important to me. Please let me know what you think in the comments!

A New Year. An Old Man.

“You better give your Peepaw a hug, I don’t think he has much longer left.” I told my wife.

His eyes were watering, he was struggling to breathe, and sometimes I would see him shake a little as he was trying to move around. The rest of the house was rustling about almost like they didn’t notice the poor old man coming to terms with his own demise.

It was only a year ago, Christmas time last year, that I had spent time with my wife’s Great Grandfather. He seemed so much more alive then, but now his body seems ready to give out. To let go of the life still in his eyes, to rest.

I wonder to myself if he feels alone. The children running around the house, parents chatting about nothing, but Peepaw sits alone in a comfortable recliner enjoying what will probably be his last Christmas. My observations are full of mixed emotions.

Here sits a man who has had a full life, much better than most. He has been married to his dear wife for over 60 years, he has started and handed down a successful business, and has a wonder family surrounding him. What more could a man ask for in his final days. How much more peacefully could anyone go?

On the other hand I feel a hint of dread. The curtains are closing, his inevitable death is coming quickly, but he is alone in his journey in this. No one can truly empathize with what he must be feeling – it must be a little strange that everyone moves around so carelessly going about their daily business as he knows that these are his final hours. Literally his final moments of existence on this planet. Everyone pretends not to notice – getting dessert almost seems more important.

Of course it’s not that no one cares. He’s an 89 year old man and his death is something almost everyone has accepted – even if it’s just subconsciously. Something unsaid we have all agreed to. Inevitability. Finality.

Still part of me feels like we should all be crowded around him – appreciating the man and his life – while he’s still coherent enough to appreciate the gesture. Part of me wants to lean in and whisper a question: “What is the one thing I should know about life?” Oh the knowledge, the wisdom, he must have during these final hours. Regrets, pride, advice.

If there is any sort of afterlife. Any karma. Any higher power. Or even if there isn’t. Let it be known that a young man noticed you that day – your final Christmas. Maybe its some comfort, some justice. A young man unrelated by blood, a young man that never said more than a few words to you, a young man who only shook your hand and stared you in the eyes and tried to communicate at that moment that I appreciated your existence, noticed, cared.

I didn’t ask anything, you never lectured me, but I learned a lot from you.

I think I’m a Stoic

Recently I ran across this Wikipedia article on Stoicism. As I read through the basic tenants it hit me: I think I’m a stoic.

Reason Over Emotion

There are a few things that ring completely true to my own way of thinking:

Stoicism teaches the development of self-control and fortitude as a means of overcoming destructive emotions; the philosophy holds that becoming a clear and unbiased thinker allows one to understand the universal reason (logos). A primary aspect of Stoicism involves improving the individual’s ethical and moral well-being: “Virtue consists in a will that is in agreement with Nature.” This principle also applies to the realm of interpersonal relationships; “to be free from anger, envy, and jealousy,” and to accept even slaves as “equals of other men, because all men alike are products of nature.”

This passage rings almost totally true for me. Often when I find myself boiling with anger I think to myself : “Take a step back, think clearly, logically.” I have always valued the searched for truth with unbiased data and thinking. I especially appreciate the idea of freedom from emotion to see the world clearly.

This certainly does not mean you are free from feeling emotion. Everyone feels emotion. I think the overall point is honing the ability to transcend the emotions you are feeling and examine yourself externally for the self. Almost like an objective outsider examining the facts of your own situation.

The Stoics believed that knowledge can be attained through the use of reason. Truth can be distinguished from fallacy; even if, in practice, only an approximation can be made. According to the Stoics, the senses constantly receive sensations: pulsations that pass from objects through the senses to the mind, where they leave an impression in the imagination (phantasia). (An impression arising from the mind was called a phantasma.)

The mind has the ability to judge (sunkatathesis)—approve or reject—an impression, enabling it to distinguish a true representation of reality from one that is false. Some impressions can be assented to immediately, but others can only achieve varying degrees of hesitant approval, which can be labeled belief or opinion (doxa). It is only through reason that we achieve clear comprehension and conviction (katalepsis). Certain and true knowledge (episteme), achievable by the Stoic sage, can be attained only by verifying the conviction with the expertise of one’s peers and the collective judgment of humankind.

This idea also seems naturally true to me. How many times has an eye witness been wrong based on misinterpreted data they “thought” they saw or experienced? True answers, it seems to me, come from data and examination.  Emotions are important, but they are subject to error and manipulation by ourselves and external forces.

My wife and I have arguments all the time because she says I’m emotionless and too logical while I accuse her of being overly-emotional.  She will laugh or cry easily while I can’t remember the last time I felt emotion strong enough to cry. It’s hard to feel an emotion strong enough to take action if you naturally take the “I need to think this through” approach.

My natural inclination is to stop, wait, and examine the facts.

Ethics and Morality

Even my natural deriving of morality seems to be borrowed from Stoicism.

…the foundation of Stoic ethics is that good lies in the state of the soul itself; in wisdom and self-control. Stoic ethics stressed the rule: “Follow where reason leads.” One must therefore strive to be free of the passions, bearing in mind that the ancient meaning of ‘passion’ was “anguish” or “suffering”, that is, “passively” reacting to external events—somewhat different from the modern use of the word…The eupatheia are feelings that result from correct judgment in the same way as passions result from incorrect judgment.

The idea was to be free of suffering through apatheia (Greek: ἀπάθεια) or peace of mind (literally, ‘without passion’), where peace of mind was understood in the ancient sense—being objective or having “clear judgment” and the maintenance of equanimity in the face of life’s highs and lows.

For the Stoics, ‘reason’ meant not only using logic, but also understanding the processes of nature—the logos, or universal reason, inherent in all things. Living according to reason and virtue, they held, is to live in harmony with the divine order of the universe, in recognition of the common reason and essential value of all people…

Following Socrates, the Stoics held that unhappiness and evil are the results of human ignorance of the reason in nature. If someone is unkind, it is because they are unaware of their own universal reason, which leads to the conclusion of kindness. The solution to evil and unhappiness then, is the practice of Stoic philosophy—to examine one’s own judgments and behavior and determine where they diverge from the universal reason of nature.

These ideas are beautiful. Recognize the “common reason and essential value of all people”. I wonder why the Greek people were such sophisticated thinkers? It’s kind of amazing to think people had these brilliant thoughts a thousand years ago, but they are still applicable today. It seems human’s haven’t changed all that much.

A Religious Journey: Searching for Faith

I’ve struggled with religion and faith my entire life. My studies began early and continue today. It started before I can remember as my Parents dropped me off at Church. Some of my fondest memories are those in a little Baptist Church as a child. Sunday school, church plays, and of course the plethora of Southern banquets featuring some of the finest dishes Grandmothers from around the county could muster.

Religion and the church community gave to me what everyone desires in life. An absolute truth, the warmth of love and affection, family, the kindness of a stranger smiling at you from a few pews away, and of course belonging. In a word: Comfort.

But from the time I can remember “believing” was always difficult. I would constantly struggle with the nagging feeling religion is make believe. I felt out of place and wondered how everyone else seemed to believe so whole-heartily and so easily while I struggled with my faith constantly.

I didn’t give up. As in life, the things that didn’t come natural to me (faith), I worked twice as hard as the next person to achieve. So I prayed daily for God to help me “believe”.

“Dear God – Please help me with my struggles in faith. Please help me find the evidence I need personally to find strength in my faith in you. I am sorry for my lack of faith and I am working hard to  find it.  Please put me on the right path.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.”

So my days would go from about the ages of 12 – 18. There were even times I believed strongly that God was there. Sometimes my hard work seemed to be paying off – though my doubts were never far behind.

Search for Faith

When I first arrived in college I decided to get serious about religion. I started watching videos that I hoped would strengthen my faith. I met a “preacher” who taught young people. And so intense self-indoctrination began – seemed to work – but eventually failed.

At one point I was ready to testify to my fellow college students on campus. I had almost convinced myself it all made sense. I painted an almost clear picture of what I had come to believe. But what I found mostly radicalized me and I saw in myself the symptoms of any individual induced to delirium.

Most of what I found I could not reconcile with my own personal thoughts and feelings.  Everything seemed overly radical, lacked evidence, and seemed almost loony. Though I learned many good lessons – those lessons were not independent to Christianity and proved nothing.

There were young earth creationist, those that claimed religion was about faith and not proof, those that claimed man and dinosaurs roamed the Earth together, and worse. Even those whom I admired failed in their efforts to provide reasonable evidence.

So, as a college student I decided to seek knowledge the best way I knew how. I enrolled in a few religion classes and finally I found what I was looking for, but not what I expected to find.

The scholarly approach to Religion was exactly what my personality craved. I learned about the history of the Bible, I found evidence of scholarly research, and was surrounded by people seeking the same information I desired. I had Christian Professors, Professors of different faiths and belief systems, and Professors with no beliefs at all.  I was truly left to gather the evidence and for the first time decide for myself rather than be told what I should believe by a Spiritual/Intellectual leader.

My Decision in Faith

I have become comfortably Agnostic. I’m an Agnostic because after years of searching for the information to strengthen my faith in Christianity, after giving it all I have to feel the right emotions, and after an entire youth spent in the indoctrination process of religion – it all failed.  I still came out hopelessly unable to believe.

I’m an Agnostic because I am a Scientist of sorts. Not a Rocket Scientist, of course, but a Scientist in logic and methodology. I am open to new evidence, new ways of thinking, and new interpretations. For or against religious belief.  Thus far all evidence points toward the non-existence of a God – especially the one described in Abrahamic religions.

I’m an Agnostic because for the first time in my life I feel like I am not lying to myself. I’m not struggling to force myself to feel a certain way or to believe a certain idea because that’s what I’ve been taught is right.  I think that’s something I can live with.

* I have written in length on religious topics on this blog.  You can check them out here.

Is discovering you are a fool the path to enlightenment?

There was a time not too many years ago when I thought I knew best about pretty much everything.  But over the last few years I have awoken to the realization that I am markedly inexperienced about most all aspects of life, and so is most everyone else.

Since then the world has become a much different place for me. Suddenly it seems so much larger, more volatile and unpredictable and much scarier. Where I used to take comfort in the many facts of life that I was so sure about, I now find myself clinging to a life raft, floating in a sea of uncertainty.

I have retreated from these ideas of absolutes- absolute truth, justice, and fairness and instead look to history, logic, science and the idea of Animal Spirits (as coined by John Maynard Keynes) to explain the world around me. But even with these tools at my disposal, finding answers only leads you down a road to more questions and inquiries.

Enlightenment through History

George Santayana, a Spanish born American philosopher coined the very famous phrases, “Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it” and “Habit is stronger than reason”.

I am familiar with Santayana thanks to an eccentric college professor I once had who bore an uncanny resemblance to David Bowie (both in stature and dress) that made us read a bunch of essays Santayana authored.

At the time I took the philosophy class I was about 19 years old and a complete moron. But some things did stick. The most important being, history will repeat because human nature is what it is.

History is a great indicator of just what mankind is capable of, both good and bad. And therefore, nothing should be a shock to any of us. Nations will continue to rise and fall; revolutions will continue to spark change, and we will continue to see free societies fall back into the same tragic pattern of dictatorship and monarchy.

People will continue to senselessly kill each other as well.

But take comfort, for time and time again the human spirit to reach for justice has always resurfaced and always find a way to fight back.

Enlightenment through Logic and Science

How many people actually know what science is? I don’t think many do, including many scientists themselves. Science is a method. That’s all. It’s a method of testing ideas and hypothesis. When someone claims something is scientifically proven they are fools. Science proves nothing, it only disproves.

Logic follows along the same lines, to me personally anyhow. This idea of logic or Logos has always been interesting to me. Aristotle called it the argument for reason. He made the argument that there were three ways to persuade a man- Logos (reason), Pathos (emotional appeal) and Ethos (persuasion by leadership and moral character).

To me, this idea of breaking down the world literally scientifically (as in methodically) and logically (by means of reason) are the best way to remove personal bias and get to the bottom of why things are as they are.

The vast majority of the world takes a different approach. The vast majority of the world looks at the world through cloudy lenses where the left eye is fogged by Pathos and the right is smudged with Ethos.

If you read Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People, you know exactly what I mean. In his seminal work, Carnegie teaches us invaluable lessons on how to win over everyone from our wives and mother-in-law to our bosses and co-workers, to the schmuck you’re trying to sell a new religion to at their front door step! How do we win them over? By employing their natural inclination to appeal to their emotions (pathos) and be persuaded by a person who speaks with authority and has a smile of gold (ethos) to win them to your cause.

While Carnegie’s book is a great tool for succeeding in the business place, marriage and personal relationships (it did wonders for my social skills), I almost feel like the novel is more a grim reminder of just how fickle and shallow most people are. Therefore, I try to stick to breaking things down methodically and logically as possible to not only understand those around me but to defend myself from similar manipulation.

Enlightenment through understanding Animal Spirits

In graduate school I took this really great course that essentially pitted Classical and Keynesian Economics head to head and made them duke it out all semester long. I left that course both enlightened and confused as ever!

The two great lessons from class that stuck with me are:

  1. An inverted yield curve almost certainly spells recession!
  2. Animal Spirits- a spontaneous urge to react prematurely- is almost certain to throw off even the most thorough quantitative deductions!

The first lesson about the inverted yield curve is pretty interesting but has nothing to do with this post. The second lesson, speaks loads about human nature at large.

When September 11th happened, many people in my community went out and stockpiled food and water. Why? What do airplanes crashing into skyscrapers hundreds of miles away in New York City have to do with food and water in northwest Georgia?  It was a desire to feel secure. Suddenly, people were flooded with an abundance of uncertainty and fear, and the only thing they knew to do was buy food and water. It was almost as if we were all knocked down a few levels on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and scrambling to find ourselves again.

This sort of symbolizes how I imagine John Maynard Keynes felt about Animal Spirits in economics. When certain situations present themselves, people tend to have these knee jerk reactions that almost seem completely illogical and sometimes even counterproductive, which throws the entire model off its axis and sends the economists with their huge unified theories back to the drawing board, scratching their heads.

The lesson to be learned is, people aren’t always logical or predictable and there are no unified theories. The only thing you can count on is that history at large will repeat itself; habits are stronger than reason and at the end of the day a typical person will fall back to their emotions and the charisma of other make their decisions.

Conclusion

I didn’t realize all this until I realized I myself was just another face in the crowd succumbing to the same follies time and time again. Now that I’ve liberated myself a bit, I think I’m happier but also much more frustrated. I feel almost trapped in an endless game of two steps forward, one step back, and once you turn on this one part of your brain, there is no going back. There is no more stepping back into that realm of Ignorance is Bliss.

The real lesson to be learned is that we are all foolish and really know little about anything at all. This is where enlightenment takes hold.

The Paradox of Infinite Time

Infinite time.

Is it possible that time is infinite?  That time goes back infinitely forever.  Before earth, before the sun, before the creation of the known Universe, before that?  Was there a starting point or is there something beyond space and time we (I) can’t comprehend. If there was a beginning is that where we find God?

If time is infinite does that mean that everything that could have happened has already happened.  Has this already happened, have I typed this before? Statistically what does it mean when there is infinite time – have I already been, will I be again?  Is that reincarnation?

Just a few questions I think about from time to time when I’ve been up too late.  I would love to hear answer if you have any!